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Part 2: Tools & Info for Sysadmins - Mega List of Tips, Tools, Books, Blogs & More

(continued from part 1)
Unlocker is a tool to help delete those irritating locked files that give you an error message like "cannot delete file" or "access is denied." It helps with killing processes, unloading DLLs, deleting index.dat files, as well as unlocking, deleting, renaming, and moving locked files—typically without requiring a reboot.
IIS Crypto's newest version adds advanced settings; registry backup; new, simpler templates; support for Windows Server 2019 and more. This tool lets you enable or disable protocols, ciphers, hashes and key exchange algorithms on Windows and reorder SSL/TLS cipher suites from IIS, change advanced settings, implement best practices with a single click, create custom templates and test your website. Available in both command line and GUI versions.
RocketDock is an application launcher with a clean interface that lets you drag/drop shortcuts for easy access and minimize windows to the dock. Features running application indicators, multi-monitor support, alpha-blended PNG and ICO icons, auto-hide and popup on mouse over, positioning and layering options. Fully customizable, portable, and compatible with MobyDock, ObjectDock, RK Launcher and Y'z Dock skins. Works even on slower computers and is Unicode compliant. Suggested by lieutenantcigarette: "If you like the dock on MacOS but prefer to use Windows, RocketDock has you covered. A superb and highly customisable dock that you can add your favourites to for easy and elegant access."
Baby FTP Server offers only the basics, but with the power to serve as a foundation for a more-complex server. Features include multi-threading, a real-time server log, support for PASV and non-PASV mode, ability to set permissions for download/upload/rename/delete/create directory. Only allows anonymous connections. Our thanks to FatherPrax for suggesting this one.
Strace is a Linux diagnostic, debugging and instructional userspace tool with a traditional command-line interface. Uses the ptrace kernel feature to monitor and tamper with interactions between processes and the kernel, including system calls, signal deliveries and changes of process state.
exa is a small, fast replacement for ls with more features and better defaults. It uses colors to distinguish file types and metadata, and it recognizes symlinks, extended attributes and Git. All in one single binary. phils_lab describes it as "'ls' on steroids, written in Rust."
rsync is a faster file transfer program for Unix to bring remote files into sync. It sends just the differences in the files across the link, without requiring both sets of files to be present at one of the ends. Suggested by zorinlynx, who adds that "rsync is GODLY for moving data around efficiently. And if an rsync is interrupted, just run it again."
Matter Wiki is a simple WYSIWYG wiki that can help teams store and collaborate. Every article gets filed under a topic, transparently, so you can tell who made what changes to which document and when. Thanks to bciar-iwdc for the recommendation.
LockHunter is a file unlocking tool that enables you to delete files that are being blocked for unknown reasons. Can be useful for fighting malware and other programs that are causing trouble. Deletes files into the recycle bin so you can restore them if necessary. Chucky2401 finds it preferable to Unlocker, "since I am on Windows 7. There are no new updates since July 2017, but the last beta was in June of this year."
aria2 is a lightweight multi-source command-line download utility that supports HTTP/HTTPS, FTP, SFTP, BitTorrent and Metalink. It can be manipulated via built-in JSON-RPC and XML-RPC interfaces. Recommended by jftuga, who appreciates it as a "cross-platform command line downloader (similar to wget or curl), but with the -x option can run a segmented download of a single file to increase throughput."
Free Services
Temp-Mail allows you to receive email at a temporary address that self-destructs after a certain period of time. Outwit all the forums, Wi-Fi owners, websites and blogs that insist you register to use them. Petti-The-Yeti says, "I don't give any company my direct email anymore. If I want to trial something but they ask for an email signup, I just grab a temporary email from here, sign up with it, and wait for the trial link or license info to come through. Then, you just download the file and close the website."
Duck DNS will point a DNS (sub domains of duckdns.org) to an IP of your choice. DDNS is a handy way for you to refer to a serverouter with an easily rememberable name for situations when the server's ip address will likely change. Suggested by xgnarf, who finds it "so much better for the free tier of noip—no 30-day nag to keep your host up."
Joe Sandbox detects and analyzes potential malicious files and URLs on Windows, Android, Mac OS, Linux and iOS for suspicious activities. It performs deep malware analysis and generates comprehensive and detailed reports. The Community Edition of Joe Sandbox Cloud allows you to run a maximum of 6 analyses per month, 3 per day on Windows, Linux and Android with limited analysis output. This one is from dangibbons94, who wanted to "share this cool service ... for malware analysis. I usually use Virus total for URL scanning, but this goes a lot more in depth. I just used basic analysis, which is free and enough for my needs."
Hybrid Analysis is a malware analysis service that detects and analyzes unknown threats for the community. This one was suggested by compupheonix, who adds that it "gets you super detailed reports... it's about the most fleshed out and detailed one I can find."
JustBeamIt is a file-transfer service that allows you to send files of any size via a peer-to-peer streaming model. Simply drag and drop your file and specify the recipient's email address. They will then receive a link that will trigger the download directly from your computer, so the file does not have to be uploaded to the service itself. The link is good for one download and expires after 10 minutes. Thanks to cooljacob204sfw for the recommendation!
ShieldsUP is a quick but powerful internet security checkup and information service. It was created by security researcher Steve Gibson to scan ports and let you know which ones have been opened through your firewalls or NAT routers.
Firefox Send is an encrypted file transfer service that allows you to share files up to 2.5GB from any browser or an Android app. Uses end-to-end encryption to keep data secure and offers security controls you can set. You can determine when your file link expires, the number of downloads, and whether to add a password. Your recipient receives a link to download the file, and they don’t need a Firefox account. This one comes from DePingus, who appreciates the focus on privacy. "They have E2E, expiring links, and a clear privacy policy."
Free DNS is a service where programmers share domain names with one another at no cost. Offers free hosting as well as dynamic DNS, static DNS, subdomain and domain hosting. They can host your domain's DNS as well as allowing you to register hostnames from domains they're hosting already. If you don't have a domain, you can sign up for a free account and create up to 5 subdomains off the domains others have contributed and point these hosts anywhere on the Internet. Thanks to 0x000000000000004C (yes, that's a username) for the suggestion!
ANY.RUN is an interactive malware analysis service for dynamic and static research of the majority of threats in any environment. It can provide a convenient in-depth analysis of new, unidentified malicious objects and help with the investigation of incidents. ImAshtonTurner appreciates it as "a great sandbox tool for viewing malware, etc."
Plik is a scalable, temporary file upload system similar to wetransfer that is written in golang. Thanks go to I_eat_Narwhals for this one!
Free My IP offers free, dynamic DNS. This service comes with no login, no ads, no newsletters, no links to click and no hassle. Kindly suggested by Jack of All Trades.
Mailinator provides free, temporary email inboxes on a receive-only, attachment-free system that requires no sign-up. All @mailinator.com addresses are public, readable and discoverable by anyone at any time—but are automatically deleted after a few hours. Can be a nice option for times when you to give out an address that won't be accessible longterm. Recommended by nachomountain, who's been using it "for years."
Magic Wormhole is a service for sending files directly with no intermediate upload, no web interface and no login. When both parties are online you with the minimal software installed, the wormhole is invoked via command line identifying the file you want to send. The server then provides a speakable, one-time-use password that you give the recipient. When they enter that password in their wormhole console, key exchange occurs and the download begins directly between your computers. rjohnson99 explains, "Magic Wormhole is sort of like JustBeamIt but is open-source and is built on Python. I use it a lot on Linux servers."
EveryCloud's Free Phish is our own, new Phishing Simulator. Once you've filled in the form and logged in, you can choose from lots of email templates (many of which we've coped from what we see in our Email Security business) and landing pages. Run a one-off free phish, then see who clicked or submitted data so you can understand where your organization is vulnerable and act accordingly.
Hardening Guides
CIS Hardening Guides contain the system security benchmarks developed by a global community of cybersecurity experts. Over 140 configuration guidelines are provided to help safeguard systems against threats. Recommended by cyanghost109 "to get a start on looking at hardening your own systems."
Podcasts
Daily Tech News is Tom Merrit's show covering the latest tech issues with some of the top experts in the field. With the focus on daily tech news and analysis, it's a great way to stay current. Thanks to EmoPolarbear for drawing it to our attention.
This Week in Enterprise Tech is a podcast that features IT experts explaining the complicated details of cutting-edge enterprise technology. Join host Lou Maresca on this informative exploration of enterprise solutions, with new episodes recorded every Friday afternoon.
Security Weekly is a podcast where a "bunch of security nerds" get together and talk shop. Topics are greatly varied, and the atmosphere is relaxed and conversational. The show typically tops out at 2 hours, which is perfect for those with a long commute. If you’re fascinated by discussion of deep technical and security-related topics, this may be a nice addition to your podcast repertoire.
Grumpy Old Geeks—What Went Wrong on the Internet and Who's To Blame is a podcast about the internet, technology and geek culture—among other things. The hosts bring their grumpy brand of humor to the "state of the world as they see it" in these roughly hour-long weekly episodes. Recommended by mkaxsnyder, who enjoys it because, "They are a good team that talk about recent and relevant topics from an IT perspective."
The Social-Engineer Podcast is a monthly discussion among the hosts—a group of security experts from SEORG—and a diverse assortment of guests. Topics focus around human behavior and how it affects information security, with new episodes released on the second Monday of every month. Thanks to MrAshRhodes for the suggestion.
The CyberWire podcasts discuss what's happening in cyberspace, providing news and commentary from industry experts. This cyber security-focused news service delivers concise, accessible, and relevant content without the gossip, sensationalism, and the marketing buzz that often distract from the stories that really matter. Appreciation to supermicromainboard for the suggestion.
Malicious Life is a podcast that tells the fascinating—and often unknown—stories of the wildest hacks you can ever imagine. Host Ran Levi, a cybersecurity expert and author, talks with the people who were actually involved to reveal the history of each event in depth. Our appreciation goes to peraphon for the recommendation.
The Broadcast Storm is a podcast for Cisco networking professionals. BluePieceOfPaper suggests it "for people studying for their CCNA/NP. Kevin Wallace is a CCIE Collaboration so he knows his *ishk. Good format for learning too. Most podcasts are about 8-15 mins long and its 'usually' an exam topic. It will be something like "HSPR" but instead of just explaining it super boring like Ben Stein reading a powerpoint, he usually goes into a story about how (insert time in his career) HSPR would have been super useful..."
Software Engineering Radio is a podcast for developers who are looking for an educational resource with original content that isn't recycled from other venues. Consists of conversations on relevant topics with experts from the software engineering world, with new episodes released three to four times per month. a9JDvXLWHumjaC tells us this is "a solid podcast for devs."
Books
System Center 2012 Configuration Manager is a comprehensive technical guide designed to help you optimize Microsoft's Configuration Manager 2012 according to your requirements and then to deploy and use it successfully. This methodical, step-by-step reference covers: the intentions behind the product and its role in the broader System Center product suite; planning, design, and implementation; and details on each of the most-important feature sets. Learn how to leverage the user-centric capabilities to provide anytime/anywhere services & software, while strengthening control and improving compliance.
Network Warrior: Everything You Need to Know That Wasn’t on the CCNA Exam is a practical guide to network infrastructure. Provides an in-depth view of routers and routing, switching (with Cisco Catalyst and Nexus switches as examples), SOHO VoIP and SOHO wireless access point design and configuration, introduction to IPv6 with configuration examples, telecom technologies in the data-networking world (including T1, DS3, frame relay, and MPLS), security, firewall theory and configuration, ACL and authentication, Quality of Service (QoS), with an emphasis on low-latency queuing (LLQ), IP address allocation, Network Time Protocol (NTP) and device failures.
Beginning the Linux Command Line is your ally in mastering Linux from the keyboard. It is intended for system administrators, software developers, and enthusiastic users who want a guide that will be useful for most distributions—i.e., all items have been checked against Ubuntu, Red Hat and SUSE. Addresses administering users and security and deploying firewalls. Updated to the latest versions of Linux to cover files and directories, including the Btrfs file system and its management and systemd boot procedure and firewall management with firewalld.
Modern Operating Systems, 4th Ed. is written for students taking intro courses on Operating Systems and for those who want an OS reference guide for work. The author, an OS researcher, includes both the latest materials on relevant operating systems as well as current research. The previous edition of Modern Operating Systems received the 2010 McGuffey Longevity Award that recognizes textbooks for excellence over time.
Time Management for System Administrators is a guide for organizing your approach to this challenging role in a way that improves your results. Bestselling author Thomas Limoncelli offers a collection of tips and techniques for navigating the competing goals and concurrent responsibilities that go along with working on large projects while also taking care of individual user's needs. The book focuses on strategies to help with daily tasks that will also allow you to handle the critical situations that inevitably require your attention. You'll learn how to manage interruptions, eliminate time wasters, keep an effective calendar, develop routines and prioritize, stay focused on the task at hand and document/automate to speed processes.
The Practice of System and Network Administration, 3rd Edition introduces beginners to advanced frameworks while serving as a guide to best practices in system administration that is helpful for even the most advanced experts. Organized into four major sections that build from the foundational elements of system administration through improved techniques for upgrades and change management to exploring assorted management topics. Covers the basics and then moves onto the advanced things that can be built on top of those basics to wield real power and execute difficult projects.
Learn Windows PowerShell in a Month of Lunches, Third Edition is designed to teach you PowerShell in a month's worth of 1-hour lessons. This updated edition covers PowerShell features that run on Windows 7, Windows Server 2008 R2 and later, PowerShell v3 and later, and it includes v5 features like PowerShellGet. For PowerShell v3 and up, Windows 7 and Windows Server 2008 R2 and later.
Troubleshooting with the Windows Sysinternals Tools is a guide to the powerful Sysinternals tools for diagnosing and troubleshooting issues. Sysinternals creator Mark Russinovich and Windows expert Aaron Margosis provide a deep understanding of Windows core concepts that aren’t well-documented elsewhere along with details on how to use Sysinternals tools to optimize any Windows system’s reliability, efficiency, performance and security. Includes an explanation of Sysinternals capabilities, details on each major tool, and examples of how the tools can be used to solve real-world cases involving error messages, hangs, sluggishness, malware infections and more.
DNS and BIND, 5th Ed. explains how to work with the Internet's distributed host information database—which is responsible for translating names into addresses, routing mail to its proper destination, and listing phone numbers according to the ENUM standard. Covers BIND 9.3.2 & 8.4.7, the what/how/why of DNS, name servers, MX records, subdividing domains (parenting), DNSSEC, TSIG, troubleshooting and more. PEPCK tells us this is "generally considered the DNS reference book (aside from the RFCs of course!)"
Windows PowerShell in Action, 3rd Ed. is a comprehensive guide to PowerShell. Written by language designer Bruce Payette and MVP Richard Siddaway, this volume gives a great introduction to Powershell, including everyday use cases and detailed examples for more-advanced topics like performance and module architecture. Covers workflows and classes, writing modules and scripts, desired state configuration and programming APIs/pipelines.This edition has been updated for PowerShell v6.
Zero Trust Networks: Building Secure Systems in Untrusted Networks explains the principles behind zero trust architecture, along with what's needed to implement it. Covers the evolution of perimeter-based defenses and how they evolved into the current broken model, case studies of zero trust in production networks on both the client and server side, example configurations for open-source tools that are useful for building a zero trust network and how to migrate from a perimeter-based network to a zero trust network in production. Kindly recommended by jaginfosec.
Tips
Here are a couple handy Windows shortcuts:
Here's a shortcut for a 4-pane explorer in Windows without installing 3rd-party software:
(Keep the win key down for the arrows, and no pauses.) Appreciation goes to ZAFJB for this one.
Our recent tip for a shortcut to get a 4-pane explorer in Windows, triggered this suggestion from SevaraB: "You can do that for an even larger grid of Windows by right-clicking the clock in the taskbar, and clicking 'Show windows side by side' to arrange them neatly. Did this for 4 rows of 6 windows when I had to have a quick 'n' dirty "video wall" of windows monitoring servers at our branches." ZAFJB adds that it actually works when you right-click "anywhere on the taskbar, except application icons or start button."
This tip comes courtesy of shipsass: "When I need to use Windows Explorer but I don't want to take my hands off the keyboard, I press Windows-E to launch Explorer and then Ctrl-L to jump to the address line and type my path. The Ctrl-L trick also works with any web browser, and it's an efficient way of talking less-technical people through instructions when 'browse to [location]' stumps them."
Clear browser history/cookies by pressing CTRL-SHIFT-DELETE on most major browsers. Thanks go to synapticpanda, who adds that this "saves me so much time when troubleshooting web apps where I am playing with the cache and such."
To rename a file with F2, while still editing the name of that file: Hit TAB to tab into the renaming of the next file. Thanks to abeeftaco for this one!
Alt-D is a reliable alternative to Ctrl-L for jumping to the address line in a browser. Thanks for this one go to fencepost_ajm, who explains: "Ctrl-L comes from the browser side as a shortcut for Location, Alt-D from the Windows Explorer side for Directory."
Browser shortcut: When typing a URL that ends with dot com, Ctrl + Enter will place the ".com" and take you to the page. Thanks to wpierre for this one!
This tip comes from anynonus, as something that daily that saves a few clicks: "Running a program with ctrl + shift + enter from start menu will start it as administrator (alt + y will select YES to run as admin) ... my user account is local admin [so] I don't feel like that is unsafe"
Building on our PowerShell resources, we received the following suggestion from halbaradkenafin: aka.ms/pskoans is "a way to learn PowerShell using PowerShell (and Pester). It's really cool and a bunch of folks have high praise for it (including a few teams within MSFT)."
Keyboard shortcut: If you already have an application open, hold ctrl + shift and middle click on the application in your task bar to open another instance as admin. Thanks go to Polymira for this one.
Remote Server Tip: "Critical advice. When testing out network configuration changes, prior to restarting the networking service or rebooting, always create a cron job that will restore your original network configuration and then reboot/restart networking on the machine after 5 minutes. If your config worked, you have enough time to remove it. If it didn't, it will fix itself. This is a beautifully simple solution that I learned from my old mentor at my very first job. I've held on to it for a long time." Thanks go to FrigidNox for the tip!
Websites
Deployment Research is the website of Johan Arwidmark, MS MVP in System Center Cloud and Datacenter Management. It is dedicated to sharing information and guidance around System Center, OS deployment, migration and more. The author shares tips and tricks to help improve the quality of IT Pros’ daily work.
Next of Windows is a website on (mostly) Microsoft-related technology. It's the place where Kent Chen—a computer veteran with many years of field experience—and Jonathan Hu—a web/mobile app developer and self-described "cool geek"—share what they know, what they learn and what they find in the hope of helping others learn and benefit.
High Scalability brings together all the relevant information about building scalable websites in one place. Because building a website with confidence requires a body of knowledge that can be slow to develop, the site focuses on moving visitors along the learning curve at a faster pace.
Information Technology Research Library is a great resource for IT-related research, white papers, reports, case studies, magazines, and eBooks. This library is provided at no charge by TradePub.com. GullibleDetective tells us it offers "free PDF files from a WIIIIIIDE variety of topics, not even just IT. Only caveat: as its a vendor-supported publishing company, you will have to give them a bit of information such as name, email address and possibly a company name. You undoubtedly have the ability to create fake information on this, mind you. The articles range from Excel templates, learning python, powershell, nosql etc. to converged architecture."
SS64 is a web-based reference guide for syntax and examples of the most-common database and OS computing commands. Recommended by Petti-The-Yeti, who adds, "I use this site all the time to look up commands and find examples while I'm building CMD and PS1 scripts."
Phishing and Malware Reporting. This website helps you put a stop to scams by getting fraudulent pages blocked. Easily report phishing webpages so they can be added to blacklists in as little as 15 minutes of your report. "Player024 tells us, "I highly recommend anyone in the industry to bookmark this page...With an average of about 10 minutes of work, I'm usually able to take down the phishing pages we receive thanks to the links posted on that website."
A Slack Channel
Windows Admin Slack is a great drive-by resource for the Windows sysadmin. This team has 33 public channels in total that cover different areas of helpful content on Windows administration.
Blogs
KC's Blog is the place where Microsoft MVP and web developer Kent Chen shares his IT insights and discoveries. The rather large library of posts offer helpful hints, how-tos, resources and news of interest to those in the Windows world.
The Windows Server Daily is the ever-current blog of technologist Katherine Moss, VP of open source & community engagement for StormlightTech. Offers brief daily posts on topics related to Windows server, Windows 10 and Administration.
An Infosec Slideshow
This security training slideshow was created for use during a quarterly infosec class. The content is offered generously by shalafi71, who adds, "Take this as a skeleton and flesh it out on your own. Take an hour or two and research the things I talk about. Tailor this to your own environment and users. Make it relevant to your people. Include corporate stories, include your audience, exclude yourself. This ain't about how smart you are at infosec, and I can't stress this enough, talk about how people can defend themselves. Give them things to look for and action they can take. No one gives a shit about your firewall rules."
Tech Tutorials
Tutorialspoint Library. This large collection of tech tutorials is a great resource for online learning. You'll find nearly 150 high-quality tutorials covering a wide array of languages and topics—from fundamentals to cutting-edge technologies. For example, this Powershell tutorial is designed for those with practical experience handling Windows-based Servers who want to learn how to install and use Windows Server 2012.
The Python Tutorial is a nice introduction to many of Python’s best features, enabling you to read and write Python modules and programs. It offers an understanding of the language's style and prepares you to learn more about the various Python library modules described in 'The Python Standard Library.' Kindly suggested by sharjeelsayed.
SysAdmin Humor
Day in the Life of a SysAdmin Episode 5: Lunch Break is an amusing look at a SysAdmin's attempt to take a brief lunch break. We imagine many of you can relate!
Have a fantastic week and as usual, let me know any comments or suggestions.
u/crispyducks
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Spreading Crypto: The Winning Strategy For Broader Adoption

Spreading Crypto: The Winning Strategy For Broader Adoption
https://reddit.com/link/heghqo/video/jnmvsbd4fo651/player
This is the third post of our Spreading Crypto series where we take a deep dive into what it’ll take to help this incredible technology reach broader adoption.
---
Our first post explored the history of protocols and how they only become widely adopted when a killer application arrives. Crypto will be no different — it needs a killer application.
In our second post, we discussed the current state of application development within our industry. Most of the developer energy and focus is with non-custodial wallets and decentralized applications. I laid out the case for why I think that's a terrible mistake.
Today we’ll be discussing a few unique strategies and approaches that crypto companies take as they push their applications to mainstream audiences. We’ll also share how our approach at Genesis Block is quite different from most in the blockchain industry. Let’s dive in.
---
Forbes once put me on a list with CZ and Vitalik, saying we were the Champions of Crypto: The Titans Driving Mainstream Crypto Adoption. I was honored and humbled to share that list with those two.
It’s true that I think about this a lot. I love crypto. I love blockchain technology. I want the world to experience it. I believe Genesis Block has a real shot at helping take crypto to the masses.
https://preview.redd.it/4rwwh127fo651.png?width=800&format=png&auto=webp&s=9f17a50717e268d265ab9890211cc92eb66d1837
But when thinking about taking a crypto app to the market, there’s an important decision that every developer, entrepreneur, or company must make. There’s a set of questions that must be answered:
How will crypto be exposed to end-users in the application? Will blockchain tech be front-and-center, requiring users to learn the basics of crypto? Or will it operate more in the background?
These questions are foundational. They establish a tone for how users interact with the product.
https://preview.redd.it/zihs3sc8fo651.png?width=800&format=png&auto=webp&s=41815d753588b7bcb195fb6eebcdf02a81c627ae
If I had to distill the answers to these questions with only two options — as if we’ve arrived at the proverbial fork in the road — here’s how I view the two diverging paths:
  1. Invite the outside world into crypto (internal focus)
  2. Take crypto to the outside world (external focus)
These product choices don’t need to be so binary. It could and should look more like a spectrum. But in practice today, most companies operate at the extremes (mostly on one extreme).
Let’s break down each of these strategies and figure out which one is most likely to be successful.
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https://preview.redd.it/2vmom8i9fo651.png?width=800&format=png&auto=webp&s=f7bec1e683130a453956f42db976c0719faed6b8

Option 1: Invite the outside world into crypto

This is the current approach for most companies in our industry. This strategy is about helping people onboard & learn about how to use crypto and blockchain technology. It’s about bringing them into our wonderful, yet strange world. It’s about trying to get more people to drink that delicious crypto Kool-aid.
When so much of the application development in our industry is focused on non-custodial products, it’s essential that users understand the basics of crypto. The consequences of not taking this educational approach can be devastating — the user could lose all their money. For non-custodial applications like MetaMask or Ledger, proper onboarding and education isn’t just a choice, but a requirement.
But even for centralized applications — where this approach is totally optional— this is still the prevailing strategy. The most popular crypto applications work hard to educate n00bs on what crypto is. Coinbase has its earn to learn portal. Binance has its blockchain academy. Gemini has their Learn page. Those are all great resources for people who want to learn.
https://preview.redd.it/a855akcqfo651.png?width=1060&format=png&auto=webp&s=32157f4a6d8a022e36fa8f57bd9d4c66761be50b
I totally understand the desire to want to bring people into our crypto world. We’ve discovered something special. We want others to touch it, feel it, experience it. We want others to go down that crypto rabbit hole just like we have.
So, this is the first approach. It requires a lot of education, evangelization, and perhaps most importantly, patience. This is where most of our industry is today: trying to bring people into the world of crypto.
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https://preview.redd.it/s982dhpafo651.png?width=800&format=png&auto=webp&s=103ef3768a1626c324c9a38a60c8aed78b6d7e16

Option 2: Take crypto to the outside world

Though this second option is a lot less popular among the crypto community, this is how I believe we ultimately achieve broader crypto adoption. And it’s exactly how we think about it at Genesis Block.
This approach is about taking crypto to the outside world — to the billions of people around the world. And doing it in a way where they don’t need to learn about the underlying protocols. No crypto education or blockchain knowledge is required.
This strategy is about abstracting away the protocol complexities and delivering a product experience that is shaped for their use-cases.
This is about meeting people where they already are. It’s about delivering an experience in a way that they expect — an app on a phone. It’s about using concepts and frameworks that they already understand — a bank —an institution that’s been around for centuries. It’s about providing financial services that they’ve needed their entire lives — like getting a loan, buying groceries, saving for a vacation, or investing.
https://preview.redd.it/43vm7q9cfo651.png?width=800&format=png&auto=webp&s=c555ea804474185f654a0930c78fbed3852785a2
This second approach is about shaping, molding, and adapting crypto for the real-world problems that exist outside of our crypto bubble.
---

What Our Industry Has Wrong

The key distinction between the two approaches is whether crypto knowledge is required to start getting value from the app. Does a user need to be onboarded, educated, and schooled about seed phrases, public & private keys, gas limits, and other crypto-related terminology? Or can the user immediately jump in and receive value?
This is yet another area where I believe our industry is making a terrible mistake. At Genesis Block, we simply don’t think the masses will care to know (or need to know) about how crypto or blockchain works. It’s unnecessary friction.
We don’t make our children learn about TCP/IP before they can browse the web. It seems strange we would consider this strategy with crypto.
https://preview.redd.it/revds4wdfo651.png?width=800&format=png&auto=webp&s=a9ebbb48c147ef239bfe84fb2c19fdba0d146d70
Yet, here we are, today most crypto companies are doing just that. Someone has spiked the punchbowl of our crypto Kool-aid. We are not thinking straight. It doesn’t make any sense.
---

The Winning Strategy

While at Mainframe we produced a number of entertaining videos. We’ve already discussed Dawn of the Dapps which poked fun at how complicated it is to interact with crypto today.
Another video we produced was Rosella Node — it was a Rosetta Stone parody product for people to learn the language of blockchain — all the terminology, phrases, acronyms, and lingo of our industry. That video highlights just how foreign and bizarre our crypto bubble is. There is a lot for normies to learn and absorb when they step foot in our industry.
If we want our crypto applications to go mainstream, then we need to stop forcing people to come into our weird world. It’s overwhelming. It’s intimidating. We need to stop making people learn about blockchain. We need to stop making users backup their seed phrase. Say that out loud — it sounds ridiculous.
The winning strategy is to take this incredible technology, package it up in a world-class application, and introduce it to the world in a way that they understand.
Most “normal” users don’t care what’s under the hood. They just want to know that the application can solve their problems and meet their needs. While the technology is incredibly disruptive, the product experience should feel simple and convenient. No extra friction. No steep learning curve. It needs to fit nicely within their existing workflows.
We need to make our applications approachable, accessible, and available to every user. From day one. Regardless of how much they know about blockchain.
This is how we take crypto mainstream. This is how blockchain technology will be adopted by billions of people around the world. And this is why Genesis Block will play an important role in that effort.
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Other Ways to Consume This Content:
We have a lot more content coming. Be sure to follow our channels: https://genesisblock.com/follow/
Have you already downloaded the app? We're Genesis Block, a new digital bank that's powered by crypto & decentralized protocols. The app is live in the App Store (iOS & Android). Get the link to download at https://genesisblock.com/download
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Tools & Info for MSPs #2 - Mega List of Tips, Tools, Books, Blogs & More

(continued from part #1)
Unlocker is a tool to help delete those irritating locked files that give you an error message like "cannot delete file" or "access is denied." It helps with killing processes, unloading DLLs, deleting index.dat files, as well as unlocking, deleting, renaming, and moving locked files—typically without requiring a reboot.
IIS Crypto's newest version adds advanced settings; registry backup; new, simpler templates; support for Windows Server 2019 and more. This tool lets you enable or disable protocols, ciphers, hashes and key exchange algorithms on Windows and reorder SSL/TLS cipher suites from IIS, change advanced settings, implement best practices with a single click, create custom templates and test your website. Available in both command line and GUI versions.
RocketDock is an application launcher with a clean interface that lets you drag/drop shortcuts for easy access and minimize windows to the dock. Features running application indicators, multi-monitor support, alpha-blended PNG and ICO icons, auto-hide and popup on mouse over, positioning and layering options. Fully customizable, portable, and compatible with MobyDock, ObjectDock, RK Launcher and Y'z Dock skins. Works even on slower computers and is Unicode compliant. Suggested by lieutenantcigarette: "If you like the dock on MacOS but prefer to use Windows, RocketDock has you covered. A superb and highly customisable dock that you can add your favourites to for easy and elegant access."
Baby FTP Server offers only the basics, but with the power to serve as a foundation for a more-complex server. Features include multi-threading, a real-time server log, support for PASV and non-PASV mode, ability to set permissions for download/upload/rename/delete/create directory. Only allows anonymous connections. Our thanks to FatherPrax for suggesting this one.
Strace is a Linux diagnostic, debugging and instructional userspace tool with a traditional command-line interface. Uses the ptrace kernel feature to monitor and tamper with interactions between processes and the kernel, including system calls, signal deliveries and changes of process state.
exa is a small, fast replacement for ls with more features and better defaults. It uses colors to distinguish file types and metadata, and it recognizes symlinks, extended attributes and Git. All in one single binary. phils_lab describes it as "'ls' on steroids, written in Rust."
rsync is a faster file transfer program for Unix to bring remote files into sync. It sends just the differences in the files across the link, without requiring both sets of files to be present at one of the ends. Suggested by zorinlynx, who adds that "rsync is GODLY for moving data around efficiently. And if an rsync is interrupted, just run it again."
Matter Wiki is a simple WYSIWYG wiki that can help teams store and collaborate. Every article gets filed under a topic, transparently, so you can tell who made what changes to which document and when. Thanks to bciar-iwdc for the recommendation.
LockHunter is a file unlocking tool that enables you to delete files that are being blocked for unknown reasons. Can be useful for fighting malware and other programs that are causing trouble. Deletes files into the recycle bin so you can restore them if necessary. Chucky2401 finds it preferable to Unlocker, "since I am on Windows 7. There are no new updates since July 2017, but the last beta was in June of this year."
aria2 is a lightweight multi-source command-line download utility that supports HTTP/HTTPS, FTP, SFTP, BitTorrent and Metalink. It can be manipulated via built-in JSON-RPC and XML-RPC interfaces. Recommended by jftuga, who appreciates it as a "cross-platform command line downloader (similar to wget or curl), but with the -x option can run a segmented download of a single file to increase throughput."
Free Services
Temp-Mail allows you to receive email at a temporary address that self-destructs after a certain period of time. Outwit all the forums, Wi-Fi owners, websites and blogs that insist you register to use them. Petti-The-Yeti says, "I don't give any company my direct email anymore. If I want to trial something but they ask for an email signup, I just grab a temporary email from here, sign up with it, and wait for the trial link or license info to come through. Then, you just download the file and close the website."
Duck DNS will point a DNS (sub domains of duckdns.org) to an IP of your choice. DDNS is a handy way for you to refer to a serverouter with an easily rememberable name for situations when the server's ip address will likely change. Suggested by xgnarf, who finds it "so much better for the free tier of noip—no 30-day nag to keep your host up."
Joe Sandbox detects and analyzes potential malicious files and URLs on Windows, Android, Mac OS, Linux and iOS for suspicious activities. It performs deep malware analysis and generates comprehensive and detailed reports. The Community Edition of Joe Sandbox Cloud allows you to run a maximum of 6 analyses per month, 3 per day on Windows, Linux and Android with limited analysis output. This one is from dangibbons94, who wanted to "share this cool service ... for malware analysis. I usually use Virus total for URL scanning, but this goes a lot more in depth. I just used basic analysis, which is free and enough for my needs."
Hybrid Analysis is a malware analysis service that detects and analyzes unknown threats for the community. This one was suggested by compupheonix, who adds that it "gets you super detailed reports... it's about the most fleshed out and detailed one I can find."
JustBeamIt is a file-transfer service that allows you to send files of any size via a peer-to-peer streaming model. Simply drag and drop your file and specify the recipient's email address. They will then receive a link that will trigger the download directly from your computer, so the file does not have to be uploaded to the service itself. The link is good for one download and expires after 10 minutes. Thanks to cooljacob204sfw for the recommendation!
ShieldsUP is a quick but powerful internet security checkup and information service. It was created by security researcher Steve Gibson to scan ports and let you know which ones have been opened through your firewalls or NAT routers.
Firefox Send is an encrypted file transfer service that allows you to share files up to 2.5GB from any browser or an Android app. Uses end-to-end encryption to keep data secure and offers security controls you can set. You can determine when your file link expires, the number of downloads, and whether to add a password. Your recipient receives a link to download the file, and they don’t need a Firefox account. This one comes from DePingus, who appreciates the focus on privacy. "They have E2E, expiring links, and a clear privacy policy."
Free DNS is a service where programmers share domain names with one another at no cost. Offers free hosting as well as dynamic DNS, static DNS, subdomain and domain hosting. They can host your domain's DNS as well as allowing you to register hostnames from domains they're hosting already. If you don't have a domain, you can sign up for a free account and create up to 5 subdomains off the domains others have contributed and point these hosts anywhere on the Internet. Thanks to 0x000000000000004C (yes, that's a username) for the suggestion!
ANY.RUN is an interactive malware analysis service for dynamic and static research of the majority of threats in any environment. It can provide a convenient in-depth analysis of new, unidentified malicious objects and help with the investigation of incidents. ImAshtonTurner appreciates it as "a great sandbox tool for viewing malware, etc."
Plik is a scalable, temporary file upload system similar to wetransfer that is written in golang. Thanks go to I_eat_Narwhals for this one!
Free My IP offers free, dynamic DNS. This service comes with no login, no ads, no newsletters, no links to click and no hassle. Kindly suggested by Jack of All Trades.
Mailinator provides free, temporary email inboxes on a receive-only, attachment-free system that requires no sign-up. All @mailinator.com addresses are public, readable and discoverable by anyone at any time—but are automatically deleted after a few hours. Can be a nice option for times when you to give out an address that won't be accessible longterm. Recommended by nachomountain, who's been using it "for years."
Magic Wormhole is a service for sending files directly with no intermediate upload, no web interface and no login. When both parties are online you with the minimal software installed, the wormhole is invoked via command line identifying the file you want to send. The server then provides a speakable, one-time-use password that you give the recipient. When they enter that password in their wormhole console, key exchange occurs and the download begins directly between your computers. rjohnson99 explains, "Magic Wormhole is sort of like JustBeamIt but is open-source and is built on Python. I use it a lot on Linux servers."
EveryCloud's Free Phish is our own, new Phishing Simulator. Once you've filled in the form and logged in, you can choose from lots of email templates (many of which we've coped from what we see in our Email Security business) and landing pages. Run a one-off free phish, then see who clicked or submitted data so you can understand where your organization is vulnerable and act accordingly.
Hardening Guides
CIS Hardening Guides contain the system security benchmarks developed by a global community of cybersecurity experts. Over 140 configuration guidelines are provided to help safeguard systems against threats. Recommended by cyanghost109 "to get a start on looking at hardening your own systems."
Podcasts
Daily Tech News is Tom Merrit's show covering the latest tech issues with some of the top experts in the field. With the focus on daily tech news and analysis, it's a great way to stay current. Thanks to EmoPolarbear for drawing it to our attention.
This Week in Enterprise Tech is a podcast that features IT experts explaining the complicated details of cutting-edge enterprise technology. Join host Lou Maresca on this informative exploration of enterprise solutions, with new episodes recorded every Friday afternoon.
Security Weekly is a podcast where a "bunch of security nerds" get together and talk shop. Topics are greatly varied, and the atmosphere is relaxed and conversational. The show typically tops out at 2 hours, which is perfect for those with a long commute. If you’re fascinated by discussion of deep technical and security-related topics, this may be a nice addition to your podcast repertoire.
Grumpy Old Geeks—What Went Wrong on the Internet and Who's To Blame is a podcast about the internet, technology and geek culture—among other things. The hosts bring their grumpy brand of humor to the "state of the world as they see it" in these roughly hour-long weekly episodes. Recommended by mkaxsnyder, who enjoys it because, "They are a good team that talk about recent and relevant topics from an IT perspective."
The Social-Engineer Podcast is a monthly discussion among the hosts—a group of security experts from SEORG—and a diverse assortment of guests. Topics focus around human behavior and how it affects information security, with new episodes released on the second Monday of every month. Thanks to MrAshRhodes for the suggestion.
The CyberWire podcasts discuss what's happening in cyberspace, providing news and commentary from industry experts. This cyber security-focused news service delivers concise, accessible, and relevant content without the gossip, sensationalism, and the marketing buzz that often distract from the stories that really matter. Appreciation to supermicromainboard for the suggestion.
Malicious Life is a podcast that tells the fascinating—and often unknown—stories of the wildest hacks you can ever imagine. Host Ran Levi, a cybersecurity expert and author, talks with the people who were actually involved to reveal the history of each event in depth. Our appreciation goes to peraphon for the recommendation.
The Broadcast Storm is a podcast for Cisco networking professionals. BluePieceOfPaper suggests it "for people studying for their CCNA/NP. Kevin Wallace is a CCIE Collaboration so he knows his *ishk. Good format for learning too. Most podcasts are about 8-15 mins long and its 'usually' an exam topic. It will be something like "HSPR" but instead of just explaining it super boring like Ben Stein reading a powerpoint, he usually goes into a story about how (insert time in his career) HSPR would have been super useful..."
Software Engineering Radio is a podcast for developers who are looking for an educational resource with original content that isn't recycled from other venues. Consists of conversations on relevant topics with experts from the software engineering world, with new episodes released three to four times per month. a9JDvXLWHumjaC tells us this is "a solid podcast for devs."
Books
System Center 2012 Configuration Manager is a comprehensive technical guide designed to help you optimize Microsoft's Configuration Manager 2012 according to your requirements and then to deploy and use it successfully. This methodical, step-by-step reference covers: the intentions behind the product and its role in the broader System Center product suite; planning, design, and implementation; and details on each of the most-important feature sets. Learn how to leverage the user-centric capabilities to provide anytime/anywhere services & software, while strengthening control and improving compliance.
Network Warrior: Everything You Need to Know That Wasn’t on the CCNA Exam is a practical guide to network infrastructure. Provides an in-depth view of routers and routing, switching (with Cisco Catalyst and Nexus switches as examples), SOHO VoIP and SOHO wireless access point design and configuration, introduction to IPv6 with configuration examples, telecom technologies in the data-networking world (including T1, DS3, frame relay, and MPLS), security, firewall theory and configuration, ACL and authentication, Quality of Service (QoS), with an emphasis on low-latency queuing (LLQ), IP address allocation, Network Time Protocol (NTP) and device failures.
Beginning the Linux Command Line is your ally in mastering Linux from the keyboard. It is intended for system administrators, software developers, and enthusiastic users who want a guide that will be useful for most distributions—i.e., all items have been checked against Ubuntu, Red Hat and SUSE. Addresses administering users and security and deploying firewalls. Updated to the latest versions of Linux to cover files and directories, including the Btrfs file system and its management and systemd boot procedure and firewall management with firewalld.
Modern Operating Systems, 4th Ed. is written for students taking intro courses on Operating Systems and for those who want an OS reference guide for work. The author, an OS researcher, includes both the latest materials on relevant operating systems as well as current research. The previous edition of Modern Operating Systems received the 2010 McGuffey Longevity Award that recognizes textbooks for excellence over time.
Time Management for System Administrators is a guide for organizing your approach to this challenging role in a way that improves your results. Bestselling author Thomas Limoncelli offers a collection of tips and techniques for navigating the competing goals and concurrent responsibilities that go along with working on large projects while also taking care of individual user's needs. The book focuses on strategies to help with daily tasks that will also allow you to handle the critical situations that inevitably require your attention. You'll learn how to manage interruptions, eliminate time wasters, keep an effective calendar, develop routines and prioritize, stay focused on the task at hand and document/automate to speed processes.
The Practice of System and Network Administration, 3rd Edition introduces beginners to advanced frameworks while serving as a guide to best practices in system administration that is helpful for even the most advanced experts. Organized into four major sections that build from the foundational elements of system administration through improved techniques for upgrades and change management to exploring assorted management topics. Covers the basics and then moves onto the advanced things that can be built on top of those basics to wield real power and execute difficult projects.
Learn Windows PowerShell in a Month of Lunches, Third Edition is designed to teach you PowerShell in a month's worth of 1-hour lessons. This updated edition covers PowerShell features that run on Windows 7, Windows Server 2008 R2 and later, PowerShell v3 and later, and it includes v5 features like PowerShellGet. For PowerShell v3 and up, Windows 7 and Windows Server 2008 R2 and later.
Troubleshooting with the Windows Sysinternals Tools is a guide to the powerful Sysinternals tools for diagnosing and troubleshooting issues. Sysinternals creator Mark Russinovich and Windows expert Aaron Margosis provide a deep understanding of Windows core concepts that aren’t well-documented elsewhere along with details on how to use Sysinternals tools to optimize any Windows system’s reliability, efficiency, performance and security. Includes an explanation of Sysinternals capabilities, details on each major tool, and examples of how the tools can be used to solve real-world cases involving error messages, hangs, sluggishness, malware infections and more.
DNS and BIND, 5th Ed. explains how to work with the Internet's distributed host information database—which is responsible for translating names into addresses, routing mail to its proper destination, and listing phone numbers according to the ENUM standard. Covers BIND 9.3.2 & 8.4.7, the what/how/why of DNS, name servers, MX records, subdividing domains (parenting), DNSSEC, TSIG, troubleshooting and more. PEPCK tells us this is "generally considered the DNS reference book (aside from the RFCs of course!)"
Windows PowerShell in Action, 3rd Ed. is a comprehensive guide to PowerShell. Written by language designer Bruce Payette and MVP Richard Siddaway, this volume gives a great introduction to Powershell, including everyday use cases and detailed examples for more-advanced topics like performance and module architecture. Covers workflows and classes, writing modules and scripts, desired state configuration and programming APIs/pipelines.This edition has been updated for PowerShell v6.
Zero Trust Networks: Building Secure Systems in Untrusted Networks explains the principles behind zero trust architecture, along with what's needed to implement it. Covers the evolution of perimeter-based defenses and how they evolved into the current broken model, case studies of zero trust in production networks on both the client and server side, example configurations for open-source tools that are useful for building a zero trust network and how to migrate from a perimeter-based network to a zero trust network in production. Kindly recommended by jaginfosec.
Tips
Here are a couple handy Windows shortcuts:
Here's a shortcut for a 4-pane explorer in Windows without installing 3rd-party software:
(Keep the win key down for the arrows, and no pauses.) Appreciation goes to ZAFJB for this one.
Our recent tip for a shortcut to get a 4-pane explorer in Windows, triggered this suggestion from SevaraB: "You can do that for an even larger grid of Windows by right-clicking the clock in the taskbar, and clicking 'Show windows side by side' to arrange them neatly. Did this for 4 rows of 6 windows when I had to have a quick 'n' dirty "video wall" of windows monitoring servers at our branches." ZAFJB adds that it actually works when you right-click "anywhere on the taskbar, except application icons or start button."
This tip comes courtesy of shipsass: "When I need to use Windows Explorer but I don't want to take my hands off the keyboard, I press Windows-E to launch Explorer and then Ctrl-L to jump to the address line and type my path. The Ctrl-L trick also works with any web browser, and it's an efficient way of talking less-technical people through instructions when 'browse to [location]' stumps them."
Clear browser history/cookies by pressing CTRL-SHIFT-DELETE on most major browsers. Thanks go to synapticpanda, who adds that this "saves me so much time when troubleshooting web apps where I am playing with the cache and such."
To rename a file with F2, while still editing the name of that file: Hit TAB to tab into the renaming of the next file. Thanks to abeeftaco for this one!
Alt-D is a reliable alternative to Ctrl-L for jumping to the address line in a browser. Thanks for this one go to fencepost_ajm, who explains: "Ctrl-L comes from the browser side as a shortcut for Location, Alt-D from the Windows Explorer side for Directory."
Browser shortcut: When typing a URL that ends with dot com, Ctrl + Enter will place the ".com" and take you to the page. Thanks to wpierre for this one!
This tip comes from anynonus, as something that daily that saves a few clicks: "Running a program with ctrl + shift + enter from start menu will start it as administrator (alt + y will select YES to run as admin) ... my user account is local admin [so] I don't feel like that is unsafe"
Building on our PowerShell resources, we received the following suggestion from halbaradkenafin: aka.ms/pskoans is "a way to learn PowerShell using PowerShell (and Pester). It's really cool and a bunch of folks have high praise for it (including a few teams within MSFT)."
Keyboard shortcut: If you already have an application open, hold ctrl + shift and middle click on the application in your task bar to open another instance as admin. Thanks go to Polymira for this one.
Remote Server Tip: "Critical advice. When testing out network configuration changes, prior to restarting the networking service or rebooting, always create a cron job that will restore your original network configuration and then reboot/restart networking on the machine after 5 minutes. If your config worked, you have enough time to remove it. If it didn't, it will fix itself. This is a beautifully simple solution that I learned from my old mentor at my very first job. I've held on to it for a long time." Thanks go to FrigidNox for the tip!
Websites
Deployment Research is the website of Johan Arwidmark, MS MVP in System Center Cloud and Datacenter Management. It is dedicated to sharing information and guidance around System Center, OS deployment, migration and more. The author shares tips and tricks to help improve the quality of IT Pros’ daily work.
Next of Windows is a website on (mostly) Microsoft-related technology. It's the place where Kent Chen—a computer veteran with many years of field experience—and Jonathan Hu—a web/mobile app developer and self-described "cool geek"—share what they know, what they learn and what they find in the hope of helping others learn and benefit.
High Scalability brings together all the relevant information about building scalable websites in one place. Because building a website with confidence requires a body of knowledge that can be slow to develop, the site focuses on moving visitors along the learning curve at a faster pace.
Information Technology Research Library is a great resource for IT-related research, white papers, reports, case studies, magazines, and eBooks. This library is provided at no charge by TradePub.com. GullibleDetective tells us it offers "free PDF files from a WIIIIIIDE variety of topics, not even just IT. Only caveat: as its a vendor-supported publishing company, you will have to give them a bit of information such as name, email address and possibly a company name. You undoubtedly have the ability to create fake information on this, mind you. The articles range from Excel templates, learning python, powershell, nosql etc. to converged architecture."
SS64 is a web-based reference guide for syntax and examples of the most-common database and OS computing commands. Recommended by Petti-The-Yeti, who adds, "I use this site all the time to look up commands and find examples while I'm building CMD and PS1 scripts."
Phishing and Malware Reporting. This website helps you put a stop to scams by getting fraudulent pages blocked. Easily report phishing webpages so they can be added to blacklists in as little as 15 minutes of your report. "Player024 tells us, "I highly recommend anyone in the industry to bookmark this page...With an average of about 10 minutes of work, I'm usually able to take down the phishing pages we receive thanks to the links posted on that website."
A Slack Channel
Windows Admin Slack is a great drive-by resource for the Windows sysadmin. This team has 33 public channels in total that cover different areas of helpful content on Windows administration.
Blogs
KC's Blog is the place where Microsoft MVP and web developer Kent Chen shares his IT insights and discoveries. The rather large library of posts offer helpful hints, how-tos, resources and news of interest to those in the Windows world.
The Windows Server Daily is the ever-current blog of technologist Katherine Moss, VP of open source & community engagement for StormlightTech. Offers brief daily posts on topics related to Windows server, Windows 10 and Administration.
An Infosec Slideshow
This security training slideshow was created for use during a quarterly infosec class. The content is offered generously by shalafi71, who adds, "Take this as a skeleton and flesh it out on your own. Take an hour or two and research the things I talk about. Tailor this to your own environment and users. Make it relevant to your people. Include corporate stories, include your audience, exclude yourself. This ain't about how smart you are at infosec, and I can't stress this enough, talk about how people can defend themselves. Give them things to look for and action they can take. No one gives a shit about your firewall rules."
Tech Tutorials
Tutorialspoint Library. This large collection of tech tutorials is a great resource for online learning. You'll find nearly 150 high-quality tutorials covering a wide array of languages and topics—from fundamentals to cutting-edge technologies. For example, this Powershell tutorial is designed for those with practical experience handling Windows-based Servers who want to learn how to install and use Windows Server 2012.
The Python Tutorial is a nice introduction to many of Python’s best features, enabling you to read and write Python modules and programs. It offers an understanding of the language's style and prepares you to learn more about the various Python library modules described in 'The Python Standard Library.' Kindly suggested by sharjeelsayed.
SysAdmin Humor
Day in the Life of a SysAdmin Episode 5: Lunch Break is an amusing look at a SysAdmin's attempt to take a brief lunch break. We imagine many of you can relate!
Have a fantastic week and as usual, let me know any comments.
Graham | CEO | EveryCloud
Fyi - I've set up a subreddit /itprotuesday, where we feature / encourage posts of some additional tools, tips etc. throughout the week. Pop over and subscribe if you’re interested.
submitted by crispyducks to msp [link] [comments]

IT Pro Tuesday #64 (part 2) - Mega List of Tips, Tools, Books, Blogs & More

(continued from part 1)
Captura is a flexible tool for capturing your screen, audio, cursor, mouse clicks and keystrokes. Features include mixing audio recorded from microphone and speaker output, command-line interface, and configurable hotkeys. Thanks to jantari for the recommedation.
Unlocker is a tool to help delete those irritating locked files that give you an error message like "cannot delete file" or "access is denied." It helps with killing processes, unloading DLLs, deleting index.dat files, as well as unlocking, deleting, renaming, and moving locked files—typically without requiring a reboot.
IIS Crypto's newest version adds advanced settings; registry backup; new, simpler templates; support for Windows Server 2019 and more. This tool lets you enable or disable protocols, ciphers, hashes and key exchange algorithms on Windows and reorder SSL/TLS cipher suites from IIS, change advanced settings, implement best practices with a single click, create custom templates and test your website. Available in both command line and GUI versions.
RocketDock is an application launcher with a clean interface that lets you drag/drop shortcuts for easy access and minimize windows to the dock. Features running application indicators, multi-monitor support, alpha-blended PNG and ICO icons, auto-hide and popup on mouse over, positioning and layering options. Fully customizable, portable, and compatible with MobyDock, ObjectDock, RK Launcher and Y'z Dock skins. Works even on slower computers and is Unicode compliant. Suggested by lieutenantcigarette: "If you like the dock on MacOS but prefer to use Windows, RocketDock has you covered. A superb and highly customisable dock that you can add your favourites to for easy and elegant access."
Baby FTP Server offers only the basics, but with the power to serve as a foundation for a more-complex server. Features include multi-threading, a real-time server log, support for PASV and non-PASV mode, ability to set permissions for download/upload/rename/delete/create directory. Only allows anonymous connections. Our thanks to FatherPrax for suggesting this one.
Strace is a Linux diagnostic, debugging and instructional userspace tool with a traditional command-line interface. Uses the ptrace kernel feature to monitor and tamper with interactions between processes and the kernel, including system calls, signal deliveries and changes of process state.
exa is a small, fast replacement for ls with more features and better defaults. It uses colors to distinguish file types and metadata, and it recognizes symlinks, extended attributes and Git. All in one single binary. phils_lab describes it as "'ls' on steroids, written in Rust."
rsync is a faster file transfer program for Unix to bring remote files into sync. It sends just the differences in the files across the link, without requiring both sets of files to be present at one of the ends. Suggested by zorinlynx, who adds that "rsync is GODLY for moving data around efficiently. And if an rsync is interrupted, just run it again."
Matter Wiki is a simple WYSIWYG wiki that can help teams store and collaborate. Every article gets filed under a topic, transparently, so you can tell who made what changes to which document and when. Thanks to bciar-iwdc for the recommendation.
LockHunter is a file unlocking tool that enables you to delete files that are being blocked for unknown reasons. Can be useful for fighting malware and other programs that are causing trouble. Deletes files into the recycle bin so you can restore them if necessary. Chucky2401 finds it preferable to Unlocker, "since I am on Windows 7. There are no new updates since July 2017, but the last beta was in June of this year."
aria2 is a lightweight multi-source command-line download utility that supports HTTP/HTTPS, FTP, SFTP, BitTorrent and Metalink. It can be manipulated via built-in JSON-RPC and XML-RPC interfaces. Recommended by jftuga, who appreciates it as a "cross-platform command line downloader (similar to wget or curl), but with the -x option can run a segmented download of a single file to increase throughput."
Free Services
Temp-Mail allows you to receive email at a temporary address that self-destructs after a certain period of time. Outwit all the forums, Wi-Fi owners, websites and blogs that insist you register to use them. Petti-The-Yeti says, "I don't give any company my direct email anymore. If I want to trial something but they ask for an email signup, I just grab a temporary email from here, sign up with it, and wait for the trial link or license info to come through. Then, you just download the file and close the website."
Duck DNS will point a DNS (sub domains of duckdns.org) to an IP of your choice. DDNS is a handy way for you to refer to a serverouter with an easily rememberable name for situations when the server's ip address will likely change. Suggested by xgnarf, who finds it "so much better for the free tier of noip—no 30-day nag to keep your host up."
Joe Sandbox detects and analyzes potential malicious files and URLs on Windows, Android, Mac OS, Linux and iOS for suspicious activities. It performs deep malware analysis and generates comprehensive and detailed reports. The Community Edition of Joe Sandbox Cloud allows you to run a maximum of 6 analyses per month, 3 per day on Windows, Linux and Android with limited analysis output. This one is from dangibbons94, who wanted to "share this cool service ... for malware analysis. I usually use Virus total for URL scanning, but this goes a lot more in depth. I just used basic analysis, which is free and enough for my needs."
Hybrid Analysis is a malware analysis service that detects and analyzes unknown threats for the community. This one was suggested by compupheonix, who adds that it "gets you super detailed reports... it's about the most fleshed out and detailed one I can find."
JustBeamIt is a file-transfer service that allows you to send files of any size via a peer-to-peer streaming model. Simply drag and drop your file and specify the recipient's email address. They will then receive a link that will trigger the download directly from your computer, so the file does not have to be uploaded to the service itself. The link is good for one download and expires after 10 minutes. Thanks to cooljacob204sfw for the recommendation!
ShieldsUP is a quick but powerful internet security checkup and information service. It was created by security researcher Steve Gibson to scan ports and let you know which ones have been opened through your firewalls or NAT routers.
Firefox Send is an encrypted file transfer service that allows you to share files up to 2.5GB from any browser or an Android app. Uses end-to-end encryption to keep data secure and offers security controls you can set. You can determine when your file link expires, the number of downloads, and whether to add a password. Your recipient receives a link to download the file, and they don’t need a Firefox account. This one comes from DePingus, who appreciates the focus on privacy. "They have E2E, expiring links, and a clear privacy policy."
Free DNS is a service where programmers share domain names with one another at no cost. Offers free hosting as well as dynamic DNS, static DNS, subdomain and domain hosting. They can host your domain's DNS as well as allowing you to register hostnames from domains they're hosting already. If you don't have a domain, you can sign up for a free account and create up to 5 subdomains off the domains others have contributed and point these hosts anywhere on the Internet. Thanks to 0x000000000000004C (yes, that's a username) for the suggestion!
ANY.RUN is an interactive malware analysis service for dynamic and static research of the majority of threats in any environment. It can provide a convenient in-depth analysis of new, unidentified malicious objects and help with the investigation of incidents. ImAshtonTurner appreciates it as "a great sandbox tool for viewing malware, etc."
Plik is a scalable, temporary file upload system similar to wetransfer that is written in golang. Thanks go to I_eat_Narwhals for this one!
Free My IP offers free, dynamic DNS. This service comes with no login, no ads, no newsletters, no links to click and no hassle. Kindly suggested by Jack of All Trades.
Mailinator provides free, temporary email inboxes on a receive-only, attachment-free system that requires no sign-up. All @mailinator.com addresses are public, readable and discoverable by anyone at any time—but are automatically deleted after a few hours. Can be a nice option for times when you to give out an address that won't be accessible longterm. Recommended by nachomountain, who's been using it "for years."
Magic Wormhole is a service for sending files directly with no intermediate upload, no web interface and no login. When both parties are online you with the minimal software installed, the wormhole is invoked via command line identifying the file you want to send. The server then provides a speakable, one-time-use password that you give the recipient. When they enter that password in their wormhole console, key exchange occurs and the download begins directly between your computers. rjohnson99 explains, "Magic Wormhole is sort of like JustBeamIt but is open-source and is built on Python. I use it a lot on Linux servers."
EveryCloud's Free Phish is our own, new Phishing Simulator. Once you've filled in the form and logged in, you can choose from lots of email templates (many of which we've coped from what we see in our Email Security business) and landing pages. Run a one-off free phish, then see who clicked or submitted data so you can understand where your organization is vulnerable and act accordingly.
Hardening Guides
CIS Hardening Guides contain the system security benchmarks developed by a global community of cybersecurity experts. Over 140 configuration guidelines are provided to help safeguard systems against threats. Recommended by cyanghost109 "to get a start on looking at hardening your own systems."
Podcasts
Daily Tech News is Tom Merrit's show covering the latest tech issues with some of the top experts in the field. With the focus on daily tech news and analysis, it's a great way to stay current. Thanks to EmoPolarbear for drawing it to our attention.
This Week in Enterprise Tech is a podcast that features IT experts explaining the complicated details of cutting-edge enterprise technology. Join host Lou Maresca on this informative exploration of enterprise solutions, with new episodes recorded every Friday afternoon.
Security Weekly is a podcast where a "bunch of security nerds" get together and talk shop. Topics are greatly varied, and the atmosphere is relaxed and conversational. The show typically tops out at 2 hours, which is perfect for those with a long commute. If you’re fascinated by discussion of deep technical and security-related topics, this may be a nice addition to your podcast repertoire.
Grumpy Old Geeks—What Went Wrong on the Internet and Who's To Blame is a podcast about the internet, technology and geek culture—among other things. The hosts bring their grumpy brand of humor to the "state of the world as they see it" in these roughly hour-long weekly episodes. Recommended by mkaxsnyder, who enjoys it because, "They are a good team that talk about recent and relevant topics from an IT perspective."
The Social-Engineer Podcast is a monthly discussion among the hosts—a group of security experts from SEORG—and a diverse assortment of guests. Topics focus around human behavior and how it affects information security, with new episodes released on the second Monday of every month. Thanks to MrAshRhodes for the suggestion.
The CyberWire podcasts discuss what's happening in cyberspace, providing news and commentary from industry experts. This cyber security-focused news service delivers concise, accessible, and relevant content without the gossip, sensationalism, and the marketing buzz that often distract from the stories that really matter. Appreciation to supermicromainboard for the suggestion.
Malicious Life is a podcast that tells the fascinating—and often unknown—stories of the wildest hacks you can ever imagine. Host Ran Levi, a cybersecurity expert and author, talks with the people who were actually involved to reveal the history of each event in depth. Our appreciation goes to peraphon for the recommendation.
The Broadcast Storm is a podcast for Cisco networking professionals. BluePieceOfPaper suggests it "for people studying for their CCNA/NP. Kevin Wallace is a CCIE Collaboration so he knows his *ishk. Good format for learning too. Most podcasts are about 8-15 mins long and its 'usually' an exam topic. It will be something like "HSPR" but instead of just explaining it super boring like Ben Stein reading a powerpoint, he usually goes into a story about how (insert time in his career) HSPR would have been super useful..."
Software Engineering Radio is a podcast for developers who are looking for an educational resource with original content that isn't recycled from other venues. Consists of conversations on relevant topics with experts from the software engineering world, with new episodes released three to four times per month. a9JDvXLWHumjaC tells us this is "a solid podcast for devs."
Books
System Center 2012 Configuration Manager is a comprehensive technical guide designed to help you optimize Microsoft's Configuration Manager 2012 according to your requirements and then to deploy and use it successfully. This methodical, step-by-step reference covers: the intentions behind the product and its role in the broader System Center product suite; planning, design, and implementation; and details on each of the most-important feature sets. Learn how to leverage the user-centric capabilities to provide anytime/anywhere services & software, while strengthening control and improving compliance.
Network Warrior: Everything You Need to Know That Wasn’t on the CCNA Exam is a practical guide to network infrastructure. Provides an in-depth view of routers and routing, switching (with Cisco Catalyst and Nexus switches as examples), SOHO VoIP and SOHO wireless access point design and configuration, introduction to IPv6 with configuration examples, telecom technologies in the data-networking world (including T1, DS3, frame relay, and MPLS), security, firewall theory and configuration, ACL and authentication, Quality of Service (QoS), with an emphasis on low-latency queuing (LLQ), IP address allocation, Network Time Protocol (NTP) and device failures.
Beginning the Linux Command Line is your ally in mastering Linux from the keyboard. It is intended for system administrators, software developers, and enthusiastic users who want a guide that will be useful for most distributions—i.e., all items have been checked against Ubuntu, Red Hat and SUSE. Addresses administering users and security and deploying firewalls. Updated to the latest versions of Linux to cover files and directories, including the Btrfs file system and its management and systemd boot procedure and firewall management with firewalld.
Modern Operating Systems, 4th Ed. is written for students taking intro courses on Operating Systems and for those who want an OS reference guide for work. The author, an OS researcher, includes both the latest materials on relevant operating systems as well as current research. The previous edition of Modern Operating Systems received the 2010 McGuffey Longevity Award that recognizes textbooks for excellence over time.
Time Management for System Administrators is a guide for organizing your approach to this challenging role in a way that improves your results. Bestselling author Thomas Limoncelli offers a collection of tips and techniques for navigating the competing goals and concurrent responsibilities that go along with working on large projects while also taking care of individual user's needs. The book focuses on strategies to help with daily tasks that will also allow you to handle the critical situations that inevitably require your attention. You'll learn how to manage interruptions, eliminate time wasters, keep an effective calendar, develop routines and prioritize, stay focused on the task at hand and document/automate to speed processes.
The Practice of System and Network Administration, 3rd Edition introduces beginners to advanced frameworks while serving as a guide to best practices in system administration that is helpful for even the most advanced experts. Organized into four major sections that build from the foundational elements of system administration through improved techniques for upgrades and change management to exploring assorted management topics. Covers the basics and then moves onto the advanced things that can be built on top of those basics to wield real power and execute difficult projects.
Learn Windows PowerShell in a Month of Lunches, Third Edition is designed to teach you PowerShell in a month's worth of 1-hour lessons. This updated edition covers PowerShell features that run on Windows 7, Windows Server 2008 R2 and later, PowerShell v3 and later, and it includes v5 features like PowerShellGet. For PowerShell v3 and up, Windows 7 and Windows Server 2008 R2 and later.
Troubleshooting with the Windows Sysinternals Tools is a guide to the powerful Sysinternals tools for diagnosing and troubleshooting issues. Sysinternals creator Mark Russinovich and Windows expert Aaron Margosis provide a deep understanding of Windows core concepts that aren’t well-documented elsewhere along with details on how to use Sysinternals tools to optimize any Windows system’s reliability, efficiency, performance and security. Includes an explanation of Sysinternals capabilities, details on each major tool, and examples of how the tools can be used to solve real-world cases involving error messages, hangs, sluggishness, malware infections and more.
DNS and BIND, 5th Ed. explains how to work with the Internet's distributed host information database—which is responsible for translating names into addresses, routing mail to its proper destination, and listing phone numbers according to the ENUM standard. Covers BIND 9.3.2 & 8.4.7, the what/how/why of DNS, name servers, MX records, subdividing domains (parenting), DNSSEC, TSIG, troubleshooting and more. PEPCK tells us this is "generally considered the DNS reference book (aside from the RFCs of course!)"
Windows PowerShell in Action, 3rd Ed. is a comprehensive guide to PowerShell. Written by language designer Bruce Payette and MVP Richard Siddaway, this volume gives a great introduction to Powershell, including everyday use cases and detailed examples for more-advanced topics like performance and module architecture. Covers workflows and classes, writing modules and scripts, desired state configuration and programming APIs/pipelines.This edition has been updated for PowerShell v6.
Zero Trust Networks: Building Secure Systems in Untrusted Networks explains the principles behind zero trust architecture, along with what's needed to implement it. Covers the evolution of perimeter-based defenses and how they evolved into the current broken model, case studies of zero trust in production networks on both the client and server side, example configurations for open-source tools that are useful for building a zero trust network and how to migrate from a perimeter-based network to a zero trust network in production. Kindly recommended by jaginfosec.
Tips
Here are a couple handy Windows shortcuts:
Here's a shortcut for a 4-pane explorer in Windows without installing 3rd-party software:
(Keep the win key down for the arrows, and no pauses.) Appreciation goes to ZAFJB for this one.
Our recent tip for a shortcut to get a 4-pane explorer in Windows, triggered this suggestion from SevaraB: "You can do that for an even larger grid of Windows by right-clicking the clock in the taskbar, and clicking 'Show windows side by side' to arrange them neatly. Did this for 4 rows of 6 windows when I had to have a quick 'n' dirty "video wall" of windows monitoring servers at our branches." ZAFJB adds that it actually works when you right-click "anywhere on the taskbar, except application icons or start button."
This tip comes courtesy of shipsass: "When I need to use Windows Explorer but I don't want to take my hands off the keyboard, I press Windows-E to launch Explorer and then Ctrl-L to jump to the address line and type my path. The Ctrl-L trick also works with any web browser, and it's an efficient way of talking less-technical people through instructions when 'browse to [location]' stumps them."
Clear browser history/cookies by pressing CTRL-SHIFT-DELETE on most major browsers. Thanks go to synapticpanda, who adds that this "saves me so much time when troubleshooting web apps where I am playing with the cache and such."
To rename a file with F2, while still editing the name of that file: Hit TAB to tab into the renaming of the next file. Thanks to abeeftaco for this one!
Alt-D is a reliable alternative to Ctrl-L for jumping to the address line in a browser. Thanks for this one go to fencepost_ajm, who explains: "Ctrl-L comes from the browser side as a shortcut for Location, Alt-D from the Windows Explorer side for Directory."
Browser shortcut: When typing a URL that ends with dot com, Ctrl + Enter will place the ".com" and take you to the page. Thanks to wpierre for this one!
This tip comes from anynonus, as something that daily that saves a few clicks: "Running a program with ctrl + shift + enter from start menu will start it as administrator (alt + y will select YES to run as admin) ... my user account is local admin [so] I don't feel like that is unsafe"
Building on our PowerShell resources, we received the following suggestion from halbaradkenafin: aka.ms/pskoans is "a way to learn PowerShell using PowerShell (and Pester). It's really cool and a bunch of folks have high praise for it (including a few teams within MSFT)."
Keyboard shortcut: If you already have an application open, hold ctrl + shift and middle click on the application in your task bar to open another instance as admin. Thanks go to Polymira for this one.
Remote Server Tip: "Critical advice. When testing out network configuration changes, prior to restarting the networking service or rebooting, always create a cron job that will restore your original network configuration and then reboot/restart networking on the machine after 5 minutes. If your config worked, you have enough time to remove it. If it didn't, it will fix itself. This is a beautifully simple solution that I learned from my old mentor at my very first job. I've held on to it for a long time." Thanks go to FrigidNox for the tip!
Websites
Deployment Research is the website of Johan Arwidmark, MS MVP in System Center Cloud and Datacenter Management. It is dedicated to sharing information and guidance around System Center, OS deployment, migration and more. The author shares tips and tricks to help improve the quality of IT Pros’ daily work.
Next of Windows is a website on (mostly) Microsoft-related technology. It's the place where Kent Chen—a computer veteran with many years of field experience—and Jonathan Hu—a web/mobile app developer and self-described "cool geek"—share what they know, what they learn and what they find in the hope of helping others learn and benefit.
High Scalability brings together all the relevant information about building scalable websites in one place. Because building a website with confidence requires a body of knowledge that can be slow to develop, the site focuses on moving visitors along the learning curve at a faster pace.
Information Technology Research Library is a great resource for IT-related research, white papers, reports, case studies, magazines, and eBooks. This library is provided at no charge by TradePub.com. GullibleDetective tells us it offers "free PDF files from a WIIIIIIDE variety of topics, not even just IT. Only caveat: as its a vendor-supported publishing company, you will have to give them a bit of information such as name, email address and possibly a company name. You undoubtedly have the ability to create fake information on this, mind you. The articles range from Excel templates, learning python, powershell, nosql etc. to converged architecture."
SS64 is a web-based reference guide for syntax and examples of the most-common database and OS computing commands. Recommended by Petti-The-Yeti, who adds, "I use this site all the time to look up commands and find examples while I'm building CMD and PS1 scripts."
Phishing and Malware Reporting. This website helps you put a stop to scams by getting fraudulent pages blocked. Easily report phishing webpages so they can be added to blacklists in as little as 15 minutes of your report. "Player024 tells us, "I highly recommend anyone in the industry to bookmark this page...With an average of about 10 minutes of work, I'm usually able to take down the phishing pages we receive thanks to the links posted on that website."
A Slack Channel
Windows Admin Slack is a great drive-by resource for the Windows sysadmin. This team has 33 public channels in total that cover different areas of helpful content on Windows administration.
Blogs
KC's Blog is the place where Microsoft MVP and web developer Kent Chen shares his IT insights and discoveries. The rather large library of posts offer helpful hints, how-tos, resources and news of interest to those in the Windows world.
The Windows Server Daily is the ever-current blog of technologist Katherine Moss, VP of open source & community engagement for StormlightTech. Offers brief daily posts on topics related to Windows server, Windows 10 and Administration.
An Infosec Slideshow
This security training slideshow was created for use during a quarterly infosec class. The content is offered generously by shalafi71, who adds, "Take this as a skeleton and flesh it out on your own. Take an hour or two and research the things I talk about. Tailor this to your own environment and users. Make it relevant to your people. Include corporate stories, include your audience, exclude yourself. This ain't about how smart you are at infosec, and I can't stress this enough, talk about how people can defend themselves. Give them things to look for and action they can take. No one gives a shit about your firewall rules."
Tech Tutorials
Tutorialspoint Library. This large collection of tech tutorials is a great resource for online learning. You'll find nearly 150 high-quality tutorials covering a wide array of languages and topics—from fundamentals to cutting-edge technologies. For example, this Powershell tutorial is designed for those with practical experience handling Windows-based Servers who want to learn how to install and use Windows Server 2012.
The Python Tutorial is a nice introduction to many of Python’s best features, enabling you to read and write Python modules and programs. It offers an understanding of the language's style and prepares you to learn more about the various Python library modules described in 'The Python Standard Library.' Kindly suggested by sharjeelsayed.
SysAdmin Humor
Day in the Life of a SysAdmin Episode 5: Lunch Break is an amusing look at a SysAdmin's attempt to take a brief lunch break. We imagine many of you can relate!
Have a fantastic week and as usual, let me know any comments.
Graham | CEO | EveryCloud
submitted by crispyducks to ITProTuesday [link] [comments]

Verge Currency Beginner's Guide

Verge Currency Beginner's Guide
A short Background
2008 was the worst financial crisis the world had experience since the great depression. The efforts of banks worldwide were not enough to prevent its occurrence. Shortly after, someone by the name of Satoshi Nakamoto offered an alternative solution. A digital currency that removes the need for a central bank. His proposal written in the Bitcoin white paper, is summarized below:
  • A secure, decentralized network.
  • A system with economic properties.
  • No need for banks or rule makers.
  • Instant transactions without a need of a third party or government approval.
  • Bringing financial services to the unbanked 2.5 billion people.
  • Total financial freedom. No one can freeze your accounts.
  • Low transaction costs. No ridiculously high transaction fees.
  • A currency with finite amount where no one can print money whenever they want.
Bitcoin
In 2009, when Satoshi Nakamoto launched Bitcoin, the network consisted of computers (in crypto terms, these are called Nodes) to approve transactions, movements of data along the chain. This allows for everyone willing to become a participant, creating a decentralized global network. Allowing for a decentralized currency, free of the control of politicians, or institutions.
The rules can only be changed if 51% of the network agrees on it. This way the network is completely democratized and resistant to hacking attacks.
Unlike today’s financial institutions, no one can freeze your account or prevent you sending money. You are the only person who truly holds your wealth.
It is an open source project. Anyone can see the code and offer or discuss changes with the community. On the other hand, anyone participating to the network with computational power gets incentives or pay, with a fractional amount of BTC.
Blockchain
The core of a secure decentralized network like Bitcoin, lies the Blockchain technology. To put it simply, the blockchain is like a series of Lego, connected to each other by linking information, called transactions. These transactions contain the following data sender, receiver and the unique signature of the sender.
The data will be converted into “hash” before being saved into a block. The bitcoin hash is generated using a set of cryptographic functions called sha256. This way the information is encrypted, is compressed and saved in the block.
Additionally, each block in the chain, contains the information from the block before it. This ensures that if someone tries to maliciously modify information in a block, all the block following this attempt will be changed, making it easier to spot.
Each block includes the information from the previous block. If someone wants to maliciously change the information in one block that change the complete result of all following blocks.
In this type of network there is only one blockchain, and all the information is kept in a public ledger which is shared amongst all the participating networks. For the blockchain to be valid, more than 50% of the participants (nodes and their computational power) must agree with it.
Bitcoin Today (2018)
Until today many, many, events have happened. The network has grown massively. The underlying code is improved in many ways. There are more and more developers and investors that have entered the cryptocurrency space.
Currently there are proposed changes being developed to the Bitcoin network that will make bitcoin rival the centralized networks of today (Visa, Mastercard), while significantly lowering the cost of these transaction.
Many alternative cryptocurrencies have been created along the way, improving some of the aspects of the bitcoin and focusing on certain applications, in the crypto-space, we call them altcoins.
WHY VERGE
The way that Bitcoin function, has severe flaws with regards to privacy:
  • Public Ledger: The transaction information is public, meaning, that transactions can be linked to a person.
  • IP Leakage: A persistent and motivated attacker will be able to associate your IP address with your bitcoin transaction.
Due to the above reasons, it was clear that there would be a need for a privacy coin. Different coins were then created that had this problem in mind. They were ‘too private’ in the sense that they completely by-passed the public ledger. The public ledger allows merchant to provide proof of transactions, which is important for bookkeeping.
Enter Verge Currency, formerly Dogecoindark; which offers transaction on the ledger, both public and private. Allowing the user to choose if the transactions are public or private.
VERGE CURRENCY
2014 saw the birth of Dogecoin Dark; in 2016, it was rebranded to Verge Currency.
Verge improves upon the original Bitcoin blockchain and aims to fulfill its initial purpose of providing individuals and businesses with a fast, efficient and decentralized way of making direct transactions while maintaining your privacy.
What is the Verge Currency Mission?
Verge Currency aims to empower people around the globe using blockchain in everyday life and makes it possible for people to engage in transactions quickly, efficiently and privately. With Verge, business and individuals now have flexible options for sending and receiving payments.
Verge Currency also offer helpful integrations and tools that enable them to handle large scale transactions between merchants and small-scale private payments.
Is Verge Currency a private company and how is it funded?
Following in the spirit of Bitcoin, Verge is an open-source software, and a community. It is not a company, never had an ICO. The development is entirely funded by the community and the developers. Currently Verge is looking into setting up an official Verge merchandise store, and an Official Verge mining pool, for multiple algorithms.
Tech
General technical capabilities of XVG blockchain:
Protocol PoW (Proof of Work)
Algorithms Scrypt, X17, Lyra2rev2, myr-groestl and blake2s
Max Coin Supply 16.5 billion XVG
Circulation Supply 15.2 billion XVG
Minable yes
Atomic Swaps Enabled
Tx (Transaction) Speed 5-10 Seconds
Tps (Transactions per sec.) 100 (Will be ~2000 with RSK)
Tx Fee 0.1 XVG
Privacy Options:
Tor + I2P Networks fully obfuscated IP address / User's Location is hidden
Stealth Addresses It enables users to anonymously receive funds to their wallet. Therefore third parties are no longer able to track receivers addresses, nor are they able to combine official wallet addresses with their stealth addresses.
RING CT Under development
See our blackpaper V5.0 for detailed information.
Development Updates
Marketing Updates

Wallets
Mining

Community
Verge is a community-driven project. The community is the pillar of Verge, from the past to the future, the community built Verge. The community or Vergefam connects everyone from around the world, regardless of cultural background. The common vision is to provide everyone access to financial freedom, and the choice of privacy while transacting.
Below you can find the Verge Telegram communities from around the world;
Official Telegram
🇧🇷 🇵🇹 Brasil/Portugal/
🇨🇦 Canada
🇳🇴 🇸🇪 🇩🇰 Norway/Sweden/Denmark
🇩🇪 🇦🇹 🇨🇭 🇱🇮 Germany/Austria/Switzerland/Liechtenstein
🇵🇹 Portugal
🇪🇸 Spain
🇱🇺 Netherlands
🇹🇷 Turkey
🇫🇷 France
Balkan
🇵🇾 Croatia
🇦🇱 🇽🇰 Albania/Kosovo
🇷🇴 Romania
🇭🇺 Hungary
🇷🇺 Russia
🇮🇳 India
🇲🇾 Malaysia
🇯🇵 Japan
🇰🇷 Korea
🇨🇳 China
🇿🇦 South Africa
🔌Wallet Support
🖥️ Mining support
Mass Adoption
Low fees, quick transactions, high volume in circulation, multiplatform support, Wraith protocol are the ingredients that make Verge perfectly positioned for mass adoption. Transact on the public ledger for everyday purchases or stay private if you wish so.
Getting Started
You can find the matching instructions as below:
See the following useful links:

Official Links
Vergecurrency.com
Verge Team
Roadmap
FAQ
Github
Block Explorer 1
Block Explorer 2
Network Status
Telegram
Twitter
Facebook
Discord
Youtube
Medium
Investfeed
Verge Zendesk
VergeFora
Last Edit: Latest development update links are added to the Tech section.
submitted by Desolatorbtc to vergecurrency [link] [comments]

The Problem with Anthem: Part 3

In part 1 of this essay, I outlined 7 game design principles against which I believe games should be measured.
In part 2, I explored Anthem's adherence to these principles and highlighted its successes and failures
In this final section, I put forward a suite of suggestions to address the failures highlighted in part 2, keeping in mind the principles put forward in part 1.

"Resurrecting this turkey"

If you read part 2, you'll discover a long litany of flaws. What on earth can be done to fix this?

To a certain extent, it depends on the amount of effort you want expend upon the title. Most of the issues are not surface-level defects they're core design decisions which are exceptionally detrimental to game-play and require significant effort to correct.

Still, on the presumption you want to correct as much as possible, here's a way forward. And bear in mind, this is a list which focuses on dealing with Anthem's deep flaws. There's no way these could all be corrected, it'd be overkill. However highlighting these flaws and suggesting corrective action can be useful in pointing the way forward. For future games.


Technical
The first issue is what appears to be a lack of resource streaming. Anthem's loading times are insane. Given an NVMe SSD can effectively stream 3.5GIGABYTES per second into ram, you could - even if you need to pull resources from multiple places - load data into 16GB of RAM in under 10 seconds. While there's no doubt much of that data will need to be processed, swizzled and downloaded into the graphics card, there is absolutely no justification for Anthem's appalling loading times. Something is wrong here, whether it be the I/O routines or the resource management system. Put simply, this pipeline is not functioning well. It would make a lot of sense to optimize every single aspect of it until it's working properly.

Second, create a resource management system which allows pre-preemptive asset loading and prioritization. Texture management might consider optimizing for visible textures using a "light-cone" style approach where the resource management system uses a visibility solution and knowledge of the player's maximum traversal speed to calculate how far away "in seconds" each texture or texture group is and preemptively loads and unloads them based on need. (Provided you have some kind of reasonable hierarchical scene graph in place and can quickly perform coarse visibility determination.)

This is the primary technical challenge inherent in creating an open world, so it's mystifying why the development team apparently chose to skip this. Open worlds live and die on their real-time resource management systems. If you can't stream assets dynamically, you just don't have an open world.

Going back to our loop cascade, let's address the failures to adhere to the principles in each loop:

The Traversal Loop
The traversal loop fails on the "choice", "challenge" and "reward" principles. This is because the world architecture is simplistic and the jet-packs devoid of any meaningful restrictions. Introducing challenge into the traversal loop requires a more densely complex world with vastly reduced capabilities for the jet-packs (at least at first). Players need more complex ways of interacting with the environment beyond gazing at it.

What's the reward for keeping your jet-pack cool? You get to keep flying.
What's the penalty for failing to do so? You crash to the ground and have to wait.

Instead of a range of outcomes, you have two. A binary outcome, as it were. No mapping of multiple skill levels to differing outcomes and no real reward or penalty. Traversal carries no risk, contains no reward. It's a milquetoast parody of real game traversal.

As a result, the player is a spectator to the world, not an active participant in it.

You really want to get an idea of how bad this is? Look up some Youtube videos on "Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice". Look at the traversal, how it enables exploration, how it sets up stealth attacks, how it gives the player options when deciding how to navigate through a scenario. Yes, it's a different style of game, but that's not the point. Anthem has none of this, which is why traversal is boring.


So, this is the kind of thing you'd need to do to beef up that traversal loop.

A) The return of fall damage.
No risk, no reward. Fall damage brings risk to the proceedings. Of course this is meaningless without rearchitecting the damage system in general. There are a number of ways this could be approached, but this is another topic addressed further down.

Fall damage allows the world to become more dangerous and provides the players with incentive to look for safe pathways through the world.
Of course to make this meaningful you need...

B) Risk/reward based traversal.
The main problem with Anthem's world is that it's dead. Dead in the sense that it's a picturesque painting which reduces the player to the role of spectator. This elimination of the player's agency is surprisingly consistent. The world has no institutional memory and as a consequence, the player has no lasting impact upon it. The player's jet=pack ruffles the water, but for all his efforts, the world is indifferent to his traversal abilities, his firepower and - most of all - his intent.

Traversal should provide opportunities to explore. To pursue reward while risking much. Dark Souls epitomizes the tension between risk and reward and Anthem would do well to add some of its own. Achieving this without rearchitecting the majority of the world would be practically impossible but Anthem is a crystal clear example of the need for your traversal loop to contain challenge and reward.

Anthem has none and as a consequence has managed to make flying Iron-man style suits boring. Chew over that for a bit.

Classic risk/reward schemes involve the player exploring for rewards and having to take risks in order to chase after the really big ones.

The Jet-pack needs to be significantly nerfed and the player needs to be given the opportunity to cling to the environment and plan their next move. An environment which banishes most of the wide open spaces except for vistas which open up when you strive to reach the high points of the map. High points which require risk and reward the player with stunning views and cool loot. Yes - remember earning loot through exploration and skill-based effort? That.

All of this requires the world to become a lot more dense. Those wide open spaces are supposed to be vistas, not empty areas you traverse by holding down a button. They'd have to go.

C) Choice
In terms of traversal, Anthem willfully deprives the player of options. Get a navigation market and blast toward it at maximum speed. Even worse, since Anthem is a cooperative shooter which is absolutely obsessed with tethering players to each other, traversal occurs at the speed of the fastest and most impatient player in the group. Those who might want to appreciate the beauty of the world or try something out are unable to do so because Anthem drags them along to the next objective regardless of their wishes. This is yet another in the long list of bewildering design decisions which reflect a complete unfamiliarity with the essentials of good game-play.

Options go hand in hand with risk/reward based traversal, but providing multiple routes to a goal allows the player the opportunity to tailor their approach. This feeds into the scenario loop where the player evaluates the challenge before them and decides how they'll approach it.

Unfortunately, Anthem has no scenario loop, so choosing a route to a target (high/low/underwater) is irrelevant. You land. Shoot. Dodge. Hide behind the environment. How you got there is irrelevant. This is because Anthem doesn't want to be anything other than a looter-shooter, so the option for stealth or tactics is completely absent. Shoot the thing. Trigger combos when you can. Rinse. Repeat. It's about as close to pulling a slot-machine handle as it's possible for a 3d game to get - the only difference is that slot machines give you gratification much more quickly.

Anthem needs to stop forcing players together. The benefit is questionable and casual matchmaking really is a crap shoot. Sure you can lock other players out of your session, but this isn't the default and the player is penalized for doing so (with lower xp).


The Combat Loop
Traversal plays almost no role in combat, so combat is pretty boring. The limitless possibility of the Javelin suit often needs to be artificially restricted (with no fly zones) as the designers realize their mistake and try and bring the player back down to earth.

Combat is run and gun with a limited suite of options. There's no opportunity to herd enemies and effectively utilize area-of-effect, no way for players to distinguish themselves with smart play, it's mostly just combo-triggering and a war of attrition between your gun's numbers and the shield/health numbers of the enemies.

Titans are cheesy as hell. Not only can they fling homing fireballs at you, they can materialize them on top of you. This makes Titans tedious to kill, rather than challenging and entertaining.

The environment is practically irrelevant to the combat. It acts as an obstacle and shield, but provides no other possible interactions.

A) Damage - combat and otherwise must persist.
Without persistent damage, the Javelin is a monster which only fails when temporarily overwhelmed. This partitions each combat encounter into a separate event with no lasting implications and the Javelin is essentially immortal outside combat. Consider the possibilities when persistent damage requires the player to reach specific zones and may require resources to repair. All of a sudden, the world of Anthem becomes more dangerous and has far greater potential for risk/reward scenarios to play out.
Consider also a scenario in which the player fights to the top of a mountain through a succession of difficult encounters with damage persistence a factor. Consider further the possibility that the player can lose the valuable items he's carrying if he can't get them back to the fort or to a storehouse.

This would help Anthem with its lack of risk and reward.

B) Bring tactics into combat.
Doing this requires the players to have a more varied suite of abilities. Allowing players to consider tradeoffs and develop a Javelin to suit their own personal style. Shoot, melee, combo setup and combo trigger are not an inspiring suite of options.

C) Bring the environment into combat
Part of the problem here is that environmental interaction is minimal. Given the opportunity to manipulate the environment, the suite of available tactical options available to players would be expanded, thus increasing their ability to use the environment tactically.

EG: Diverting water, tipping rocks, creating pits or utilising the wind.

D) Create unique, interesting and challenging enemies.
Anthem's enemies are boring and vary between irrelevant fodder and cheesy bosses. The giant spider is the most interesting enemy to fight and this was in the demo. That this represents the high point of the game rather than an indicator of the game's quality is a savage indictment of the combat encounter design.


E) Allow the player to employ high-risk/high-reward strategies.
One of the key aspects of Dark Souls style games is that the reward justifies the risk. Boss fights results in considerable rewards and the fight itself is often an exercise in choosing between small, safe incremental damage and high-risk/high reward strategies which offer the lure of closing the right out quickly.

Balancing risk vs reward is another aspect of player choice - and thus personalization. Anthem's narrow range of combat expression limits the possibility for such strategies, but redesigning the enemies and opening up the player's capabilities would enable this kind of tactical choice on a moment by moment basis.

EG: Do I try a risky, high-damaging move and shut an enemy down before he can trigger reinforcements or do I find a good defensive position and chip away at health until everyone - including reinforcements - are dead? (Note that this kind of consideration is not an option in Anthem).

F) Increase the player's range of expression in combat
One thing about Diablo 3 - the player has a plethora of options in terms of how he'll build his character and optimize the use of high-level loot to cope with the challenges of significantly tougher encounters.

Anthem needs to allow the player to do more than shoot and trigger combos. For example - and really just off the top of my head - consider the following possibilities:

- Slow time/stasis
- Area effect
- Mind control
- Cloak
- Stealth/Backstab
- Environmental destruction
- Artillery strike
- Decoys

What's important to realize is that these options must be exercised against challenging enemies. Anthem has too much useless fodder whose only purpose is to die and drop armor and ammunition. (Speaking of which - the ammunition inventory mechanic is the absolute pits.)


The Resource Loop
The fundamental idea behind the resource loop is to allow the player to accumulate a kind of virtual currency which can then be traded for expanded capabilities, thus allowing the player to customise the game in a way which appeals to them most. This is often experience points, levels, praxis points or some other accumulation. This allows the player to exercise choice over the medium to long term and customise the game to suit his predilections and skill-set.

To do so, the player needs a tech tree. And consider the other possibilities:
- Discovering an ancient blueprint and going on a quest to retrieve the other blueprints and to find the necessary items to build a new Javelin platform.
- Discovering new technologies which can be used to develop a whole new class of abilities
- Gaining rare resources which can only be found through skilled exploration of the landscape



The Loot Loop
This is the most objectionable and least fun aspect of the whole exercise. Destiny and Anthem want to draw the player into an operant conditioning (gambling) loop where pretty colors addict players into repeating a joyless grind as often as humanly possible.

It's a cynical exercise to begin with, but if you want to actually make this work, you need to first expand the capabilities of your mechs, throw in a tech tree and then provide a wide range of possible buffs which extend far beyond the classic "more shields/more armobigger guns" paradigm. Anthem's loot sucks because there's not many ways it can buff the mechs, not because the drop rates are rubbish. (Oh, and is there a screen somewhere which shows the accumulated results of all your buffs? Because if there is I can't find the damn thing.)



Conclusion
To wrap this up: I had high hopes for Anthem and was incredibly disappointed by the result. And this is not an isolated example. I really am increasingly bewildered by an increasing lack of game design chops in some AAA studios. Some people are doing it well, but a fair amount are doing it pretty badly. I don't know what happened with this title, but it feels like Bioware lacks anyone who really understands game-play. A significant correction is needed and the importance of challenge, reward and multi-axial player choice really does need to be reiterated as these founding principles really do seem to have become lost along the way.

So if there's three things which I hope this essay is pounding into some people's heads, it's this: Choice! Challenge! Reward! These are the essentials people. (And it's why "Gone Home", "Dear Esther" and "What remains of Edith Finch" are not games.)

If Bioware implements even half of what I've outlined here, they've got half a chance of resurrecting this turkey. If they keep tinkering with drop rates and promising minuscule content drops every 3 months, then stick a fork in it - Anthem is done.


TL;DR - Anthem is boring. Hey maybe make it fun?

submitted by PJ_Heywood to AnthemTheGame [link] [comments]

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Wroclove.rb 2019 highlights

Our team couldn’t miss Wroclove.rb conference in March. As usual, great community, talks, and the atmosphere. We took a lot of notes for the rest of the team but we think they are worth sharing here.

Building UIs for Microservices

It was a talk in which Ethan Garofolo told that microservice architecture is not about deploying parts of our apps on different servers but about connections between those parts. Sometimes people just deploy parts of an app on different servers but those parts are still highly coupled together and know a lot about each other. That is not microservices but distributed monolith.
When we really have pretty independent microservices, we get new UI challenges. For example, we have an architecture with separated read and write models (or separate services). Sometimes we can’t amend read model immediately, and updating takes time when we create an entity in such a system
We should be aware of such things in our system and use special UI patterns for this. For example:
  1. A user enters invalid data. Our app accepts it immediately and returns an acknowledgment to the client. Then backend validates data in background and client polls for the result.
  2. Sometimes it’s ok to just show a loader.
We should think about UI at the very beginning or it will be too late to modify.
Slides from Ethan Garofolo talk.

Handling file uploads for a modern developer

Janko Marohnić an author of Shrine gem described how the Shrine works and why it’s better than other solutions:
It is recommended to use it with Uppy 1, frontend lib for uploading file which is customizable and feature-rich.
https://speakerdeck.com/janko_m/handling-file-uploads-for-a-modern-developer

Development with Axioms

Developers don’t like to argue about simple things. They rather want to work on complex problems and fix real issues. So the team of developers decided to create a list of axioms everybody in the team agrees on which should help them avoid unnecessary discussions.
Axiom is a statement everybody agrees on. For example:
  1. Downtime has no value.
  2. Redundancy provides no value.
  3. And others.
Then, based on their axioms they created assumptions and rules. And one of the rules was about priorities of operations they apply to code:
Remove > Fix > Refactor > Change > Add
Since “redundancy provides no value” when we have something we could delete we should delete it first, etc. And use those “remove”, “fix”, etc. verbs in commit messages and arrange their commits in a pull request in order of priority (remove things before refactoring, refactor before adding).
Having these axioms they may discuss fewer things in PRs.
I was inspired by how they communicated internally and deal with human problems. Thanks, Martin Gamsjaeger for the talk!

Autoloading

Autoloading is unpredictable, dangerous, and can’t be implemented right.
Example 1:
  1. You load module A.
  2. You load module B that depends on module A current state.
  3. You change module A and module B may become invalid.
Given that Rails reloads modules on change you can never tell which module is loaded first.
Also, since we have autoloading only in development we kind of develop our code in one environment but users execute it in a different one on a server in production. Which may be inconsistent.
One of the proposed solutions is to have a file where you list all your constants in particular order so Rails load it in this order.

Optimistic UI & Live updates with Logux

Even in the modern world, people get into a situation when they have either no internet connection or a very poor one. For example, we have limited connection in the subway.
Our usual approach is to either do nothing when we have no internet connection (page stuck) or to show a loader animation. Nobody likes loader animations and nobody likes to wait. Imagine you would see a spinner every time you click on like button in Twitter instead of a beautiful fireworks animation.
We could solve this by creating an optimistic UI: we apply changes on frontend first and wait until they sync with server. And there are a number of strategies on how to deal with conflicts (two users liked a tweet in offline at the same time) and inconsistency.
Logux gives us some tools to make optimistic UIs faster. It may send all the events we have in redux on the frontend to the server and vice-versa.
Slides from Dmitry Salahutdinov talk:
https://speakerdeck.com/dsalahutdinov/optimistic-ui-and-live-updates-with-logux-and-ruby

Towards the post-framework future

Frameworks make our life much easier. Unfortunately, often it is easier only for the first few months.
Victor Shepelev draws an analogy with industrial approaches:
Frameworks are not the only choice. We could pick the right tools for the work and build our apps using different heterogeneous tools. It is totally ok to get Rails and use ROM instead of ActiveRecord, or cells instead of rails views.
Victors’s presentation on Google docs.

Orchestrating video transcoding in Ruby: A story

A great story about building a service that transcodes a lot of videos. If you’re interested in video processing, I highly recommend watching the video. Here’s a list of tips I remember:
  1. Encode uploaded video to lower quality first because it would be quick and users will see it in UI quickly.
  2. AWS lambda is not the right place to do transcoding if you have a lot of videos uploaded to your site because it would cost a lot of money.
  3. Optimize video for streaming during encoding: ffmpeg -movflags + faststart .
  4. If you allow processing remote files (user provided an URL of video) consider downloading a file first on your server and then transcode. It may be 50x faster because of reasons.
  5. FFmpeg has options presets, use them.
  6. Collect metadata of initial and converted video files. This will help to debug things. ffprobe gives you video file metadata.
Slides from Michał Matyas talk.

The TruffleRuby Compilation Pipeline

Thanks, Chris Seaton for this talk. Oracle created GraalVM to make scripting languages run really fast (as fast as javascript in browsers).
They wrote compiler of ruby code to GraalVM and it works well. But our ruby programs consist not only with ruby code but also with C code from C extensions. That is the usual challenge for alternative ruby implementations. JRuby can’t work with C extensions so people usually create alternative gems (jdbc-postgres instead of pg).
In TruffleRuby they use LLVM to compile C extensions to GraalVM bytecode:
https://preview.redd.it/q0z6ec6dr0w21.jpg?width=666&format=pjpg&auto=webp&s=0eda23292abda5498d64b0652c3d0ee5455b9537
So TruffleRuby is fast they say.
I’ve just described this and realized that we probably have LLVM backend for JVM so we can use C extensions with JRuby the similar way.
https://preview.redd.it/dqb2nfehr0w21.png?width=72&format=png&auto=webp&s=d579928cf563c8e67422bd885af58bfba8e69f77

Events. Events. Events!

It is a good and smooth introduction to Event Sourcing. The speaker Anton Davydov suggests reading “Designing Data-Intensive Applications” for more info on this topic.
Event storages for rails: rails-event-store, eventide.
https://speakerdeck.com/davydovanton/events-events-events

How to hijack, proxy and smuggle sockets with Rack/Ruby

It is possible to make our browser to listen to a TCP socket using an extension (and a native binary but soon only extension will be required). It is possible to open a TCP connection from a browser to our server which will be able to send any arbitrary TCP traffic (not only http).
So we can make an incredible setup:
  1. Our browser listens for traffic on localhost:1234.
  2. ssh or vnc client connects to localhost:1234.
  3. Browser then redirects all this traffic to our server.
  4. Our server (in ruby) keeps connection with our browser and another server.
  5. Our server get traffic (ssh or vnc or any) from browser and proxies it to another server and vice versa.
It is easy to spawn a thread per connection and do the job but this doesn’t scale. The talk shows us how to make it performant enough for production by implementing some kind of an event loop and using specific operating system features such as EPOLL syscalls.
Why?
Dávid Halász is a developer at ManageIQ. They build a tool for developers and DevOps to manage their infrastructure. Sometimes it happens that a DevOps wants to access their server via vnc. ManageIQ server has access to vnc, but DevOps doesn’t. So we implement a proxy in ManageIQ which would proxy traffic between DevOps and their server. But ManageIQ is rails or rack-based app, and it accepts only HTTP queries, what can we do? Well, we make DevOps’ browser to connect to ManageIQ via HTTP and establish a long living connection. Then we make this connection to be able to send arbitrary TCP traffic so now DevOps’ browser can send any data to ManageIQ server. How to make it send vnc traffic? Well, we make DevOps’ browser to open a server at localhost:1234 so vnc client connects to this localhost:1234 and then the browser sends traffic to ManageIQ, and it sends it to vnc server.
As I understood nothing during the talk, I had to drink a couple of beers with David at the afterparty to finally make it clear.
Slides from Dávid Halász talk.

Sonic Pi

There were a couple of SonicPi sessions during lightning talks. Check the video how it works (not from wroclove.rb but describes what Sonic Pi is):
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v9fKE0huqAE
The photos and speaker’s talks have taken from an official wroclove.rb twitter account.
Many thanks to organizers of the event and see you on Wroclove.rb 2020!
submitted by datarockets to rubyonrails [link] [comments]

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